Puppy Information

We recommend that for the first few days after bringing your puppy home, you limit your visitors to your immediate family.  This will help reduce the stress on your puppy.

You will want to buy a crate that your puppy can grow into, preferably one that has a divider that you can make smaller and adjust as he grows.  If your kennel is too big, he will use one half for sleep and the other half as his bathroom.  Puppies generally do not like to go potty where they sleep, but they will if they have no choice.  You do not want your puppy to have an accident in his crate because it's a hard habit to break once they start. He probably will cry for the first few nights.  We recommend that you try to ignore it as hard as it may be and try to resist bringing him into your bed to sleep with you.  It is important that he learns to sleep quietly in his crate. We suggest having your puppy sleep in his crate next to your bed, to help settle him and reduce the whining.  When the puppy starts to whine, we usually just put our fingers in the crate so they can smell them, and they go right back to sleep.   He just wants to know that he’s not alone.

 If your puppy hasn't gone potty before bed, take him outside and then straight back to his crate.  Keep it strictly business and try to resist the urge to pet, play or talk to your puppy.

 

​Feeding 

Your puppy has been on a schedule since he has been weaned from his mother.  Your puppy will eat 3 times a day for the first 3-4 months and then dropped down to 2 times a day. We give our puppies 20 minutes per feeding.  This way they learn they have a certain amount of time to eat and it will be easier to "potty train" than if he is grazing throughout the day.  Your puppy will be eating between 1 1/2 -2 cups (*this will increase as he grows) of food per day, split into 3 feedings.  Feeding times are 8:00 am, 1:00 pm and 6:00 pm.  You can change these times to fit your schedule, but we do recommend that you be consistent as this will help you to determine when your puppy will have to go outside for his potty break.  Puppies generally need to go potty right after they eat.  When you notice that your puppy is putting his nose to the ground and turning in a circle, this is a sign that he needs to go.

*Do not give your puppy water 2 hours before bedtime or you will have to get up in the middle of the night to let him out.

We recommend keeping your puppy on the same food that we have them on.  It is one of the best puppy foods on the market.  If you need to change your puppy's food, we recommend you do it very slowly.  Changing your puppy’s food too fast will cause him to have diarrhea and can be challenging to correct.

 

Example:

7 days  75% regular food  25% new food

7 days  50% regular food  50% new food

7 days  25% regular food  75% new food

22nd day 100% new dog food

We are feeding the puppies Acana Puppy Recipe.  They will get approximately

1 1/2 - 2 cups of food per day for standard size puppies, 1-1/2 cups for mini/medium size.  The amount will increase as your puppy grows.

  *If your puppy finishes all of his/her food and is looking for more, increase the amount you're feeding.

 

Some puppies/dogs are always hungry and will continue to eat non stop. If your puppy looks like he/she is getting chubby, decrease the amount you are feeding.  Chubby puppies may look cute, but it is hard on their developing bone and joints.

Training your puppy

 

Your puppy is learning his place in your family.  We recommend that you do not let your puppy on your sofa or your bed when he is young.  This tells him that he is your equal and he will start to challenge you to be the leader.  This is especially important if you have young children.  You do not want your puppy to bully your children.  On the other hand, you want to make sure children aren’t aggressive with your puppy.  This can lead to distrust, growling, snapping, and biting. 

*Supervising your children when they are with your puppy is very important when they are young.

We have found that positive reinforcement is the best and fastest way to train a puppy.  Have plenty of soft chewy treats on hand so when you ask something of him, you can immediately reward him with a treat.  Try to steer him away from the unwanted behaviour and go overboard on the praise when he does something you want.  Puppies want to do what you're asking of them, but sometimes are unsure of what it is. Puppy classes are a great way to get them on the right track and helps with socializing them too.

Toys

It's good to have an assortment of toys for your puppy that you can switch out every few days to avoid boredom.  Stuffed toys and balls are great, but you need to watch over them to make sure they do not swallow any of the pieces.  Kong’s and nylon bones are safe for them to play within their crate.

*Avoid rawhide bones as they are a choking hazard and can get impacted in their intestines causing death.  If you find that he is ripping a toy apart, it's best to take the toy away.  Puppies will swallow anything!

Exercise

It is very important that you do not over-exercise your puppy when he is young.  Their joints are still developing, and you want to make sure their hip bones stay tight in their sockets.  If you have slippery floors in your home, it is best not to play any games where he will be running.  Running up and downstairs is very hard on a young puppy’s hips.  Taking your puppy out for a long jog is not recommended until after they are 18 months old.

Things to avoid:

Running up and downstairs

Jumping off a bed

Jumping out of a car or truck

Long jogs

Biking with your puppy running alongside you

Running/sliding on slippery flooring

 

 

Vaccinations

Your puppy will receive his first vaccination and check-up 7.5 - 8 weeks.  He will need his 2nd vaccination, 4 weeks after (12 weeks old), and his 3rd vaccination plus rabies 4 weeks after that. (16 weeks old) Your puppy is not fully protected from diseases until all his vaccinations are completed. 

Avoid taking your puppy to public areas and dog parks until they are completed.  If you have company over, make sure your puppy does not have access to their shoes as they can unknowingly bring in unwanted diseases that can harm your puppy.

​We recommend that for the first few days after bringing your puppy home, you limit your visitors to your immediate family.  This will help reduce the stress on your puppy.

Crate Training

 

You will want to buy a crate that your puppy can grow into, preferably one that has a divider that you can make smaller and adjust as he grows.  If your kennel is too big, he will use one half for sleep and the other half as his bathroom.  Puppies generally do not like to go potty where they sleep, but they will if they have no choice.  You do not want your puppy to have an accident in his crate because it's a hard habit to break once they start. He probably will cry for the first few nights.  We recommend that you try to ignore it as hard as it may be and try to resist bringing him into your bed to sleep with you.  It is important that he learns to sleep quietly in his crate. We suggest having your puppy sleep in his crate next to your bed, to help settle him and reduce the whining.  When the puppy starts to whine, we usually just put our fingers in the crate so they can smell them, and they go right back to sleep.   He just wants to know that he’s not alone.

 If your puppy hasn't gone potty before bed, take him outside and then straight back to his crate.  Keep it strictly business and try to resist the urge to pet, play or talk to your puppy.

 

 

Safe Confinement

 

We recommend that you do not give your puppy the run of your home. Baby gates are a great way to help you confine your little one to a room that you and your family gather in. If your home is an open concept, you might want to consider purchasing a small pen to put him in when you can’t keep an eye on him.  You want to prevent your puppy from getting into something he shouldn't, or having any accidents, but still, be near your family. He will not be happy if he is put in a room away from everyone and will let you know it.

Be prepared for some bumps in the road.  Your puppy will have accidents in your home and will probably chew something that he shouldn't.

 

*Goldendoodles are notorious for eating socks and underwear.  Make sure you have these items put away and have a lid for your hampers.  

PUPPY SCHEDULE (example)

 

6:30 - Outside, potty break, playtime

8:00 - Feeding time

8:20 - Crate

8:40 - Outside, potty break, playtime

9:00 - Naptime

11:00 - Outside, potty break, playtime

12:00 - Naptime

1:00 - Feeding time

1:20 - Crate

1:40 - Outside, potty break, playtime

2:30 - Naptime

4:30 - Outside, potty break, playtime

5:00 - Naptime

6:00 - Feeding time (no food after this feeding)

6:20 - Crate

6:40 - Outside, potty break, playtime

7:30 - Naptime

8:30 - Playtime, potty break (no water after this point)

10:30 - Potty break, bedtime